15 Agustus 2011

Micro Expressions Lying

Posted at 09.34 by huda
A micro expression is a brief, involuntary facial expression shown on the face of humans according to emotions experienced. They usually occur in high-stakes situations, where people have something to lose or gain. Unlike regular facial expressions, it is difficult to fake microexpressions. Microexpressions express the seven universal emotions: disgust, anger, fear, sadness, happiness, surprise, and contempt. However in the 1990s Paul Ekman expanded his list of basic emotions, including a range of positive and negative emotions not all of which are encoded in facial muscles. These emotions are amusement, contempt, embarrassment, excitement, guilt, pride, relief, satisfaction, pleasure, and shame. They are very brief in duration, lasting only 1/25 to 1/15 of a second.

The Facial Action Coding System or FACS is used to identify facial expression. This identifies the muscles that produce the facial expressions. To measure the muscle movements the action unit (AU) was developed. This system measures the relaxation or contraction of each individual muscle and assigns a unit. More than one muscle can be grouped into an Action Unit or the muscle may be divided into separate action units. The score consists of duration, intensity and asymmetry. This can be useful in identifying depression or measurement of pain in patients that are unable to express themselves.

Here is a brief quiz to test your ability to correctly identify the emotion behind facial expressions. To take the quiz, click a numbered button below to view images of individuals. These images will change briefly to display an expression. After the expression has flashed click on the word that describes the expression you have identitied. If you were wrong, click on another word button until you are told you are right. After the expression has flashed, you can press the corresponding numeric key on your keyboard to hold the expression on the screen.

This interactive graphic is based on "The Micro Expression Training Tool" developed by Paul Ekman, PH.D., a professor of psychology at the University of California Medical School in San Francisco.

Get more informations, click here and here.

(Source: wikipedia.com; cio.com)

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